New Release – Themes for Silcaville (album) by Pocket Lint

Pocket Lint is a solo artist working in London and has been moving increasingly in a more electronic direction.

“I was formerly a guitar player in a punk / new wave band. I write and produce all of the music myself. I record at a little home studio and love to use found sounds, which I call Aural Bonbons.”

On 6th September Pocket Lint will be releasing an album called ‘Themes for Silcaville’. You can find a link for a pre-order here.

“It is my first physical release as a solo artist. It is an album being released on cassette and as a download.”

“This is the soundtrack for an imaginary film. The idea comes from reading about Barry Adamson’s Moss Side Story album many years ago. I have always fancied writing a soundtrack and in lockdown it struck me that I could and should.”

Is it a concept album? What’s it about?

“As I mentioned before, it is the soundtrack to an imagined film. Silcaville is an imagined port city where a series of murders have taken place. The soundtrack is the music to a film where a detective, the stranger, is invited in to investigate the murders, by the guilds who run the city. It is a sci-fi noir thriller. It hopefully tells his story through 10 pieces. There are recurring themes and sounds which hopefully help the listener draw pictures of the main characters and places.”

Does the whole album fit into a particular musical genre, or does it borrow from multiple forms?

“It certainly borrows from those early 80s soundtracks by people like Vangelis, Moroder and John Carpenter. But, I also spent time researching key signatures used in the classical period and the emotions and feelings they were felt to have. For example, the city’s theme is in GMajor which was thought to be “Serious, Magnificent, Fantasy”.”

Is there a story behind the cover art?

“The cover art was actually the first part to the work. I decided to follow Barry Adamson’s model from Moss Side Story and during last winter took lots of photographs around Canary Wharf which would serve as mood pieces and give a sense of place to what later became Silcaville. I was borrowing, to an extent, from Goddard’s city Alphaville, a futuristic city of glass. As I took the images, I began to construct a basic, but loose, narrative and the pieces were written to reflect that.”

Published by leancool20

Drinks tea, not coffee. Usually dressed in black.

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